To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 17-21 Comic Strip Lesson

To Kill a Mockingbird chapters 17-19

In this engaging and thought-provoking lesson, students will embark on a creative journey through the pivotal courtroom scenes in chapters 17 – 21 of To Kill a Mockingbird. This lesson plan is designed to deepen students’ understanding of the novel’s complex themes, such as racial injustice, moral integrity, and the power of perspective. By creating a comic strip that captures the essence of the trial of Tom Robinson, students will not only explore the intricacies of the narrative but also develop their analytical and artistic skills. This unique approach allows them to visually express the emotional intensity and narrative significance of the testimonies from characters like Atticus Finch, Mayella Ewell, and Tom Robinson himself. As they illustrate these critical moments of the story, students will gain a more profound appreciation of the novel’s enduring impact on discussions of justice and equality.

Learning Goals

  • I will be able to analyze and interpret key elements of courtroom testimony in To Kill a Mockingbird.
  • I will be able to creatively express the emotional and narrative aspects of the trial through a comic strip format.
  • I will be able to effectively communicate the sequence of events and their impact on the trial’s outcome.

Materials

Process

  1. Introduce the Testimony Organizer. As students read, they should fill in the organizer.
  2. Read chapters 17-21 of To Kill a Mockingbird.
  3. Complete the organizer.
  4. Complete the comic strip activity.

Testimony Organizer for Tom Robinson's Trial

  1. Witness Name:
  • Role/Relationship to the Case:
  • Key Points of Testimony:
  • Contradictions/Revelations:
  1. Witness Name:
  • Role/Relationship to the Case:
  • Key Points of Testimony:
  • Contradictions/Revelations:
  1. Witness Name:
  • Role/Relationship to the Case:
  • Key Points of Testimony:
  • Contradictions/Revelations:
  1. Witness Name:
  • Role/Relationship to the Case:
  • Key Points of Testimony:
  • Contradictions/Revelations:

Instructions for Creating a Comic Strip on the Tom Robinson Trial

Objective: Create a 7-frame comic strip depicting key moments from the trial in “To Kill a Mockingbird,” focusing on the testimonies and statements made by various characters.

Frame Details:

  • Frame 1 – Atticus’ Opening Statements: Capture the essence of Atticus Finch’s opening remarks. Focus on his tone, the key points he makes about justice, and his demeanor.
  • Frame 2 – Heck Tate’s Testimony: Illustrate the most significant part of Sheriff Heck Tate’s testimony. Pay attention to his account of the events and how he presents them.
  • Frame 3 – Bob Ewell’s Testimony: Depict a crucial moment from Bob Ewell’s testimony. Consider his attitude, accusations, and the reactions of the people in the courtroom.
  • Frame 4 – Mayella Ewell’s Testimony: Highlight an important part of Mayella Ewell’s testimony. Reflect her emotional state and the nature of her allegations.
  • Frame 5 – Tom Robinson’s Testimony: Show a key aspect of Tom Robinson’s testimony. Focus on his version of events and his interactions with the Ewells.
  • Frame 6 – Atticus’ Closing Statement: Illustrate a powerful moment from Atticus’s closing statement, emphasizing his plea for justice and equality.
  • Frame 7 – The Verdict: Capture the courtroom’s reaction to the verdict. Reflect the tension and emotion of this pivotal moment.

Marking Criteria:

  • Accuracy (4): The comic strip should accurately reflect the events, dialogues, and spirit of the trial as depicted in the novel.
  • Creativity and Expression (2): Use of creative elements to express the characters’ emotions, the atmosphere of the courtroom, and the tension of the trial.
  • Clarity and Cohesion (2): The sequence of frames should be logical and easy to follow, with clear transitions between each testimony.

/10

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