To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 27: Unveiling Threats & Change

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 27

In To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 27, Lee explores the aftermath of the Tom Robinson trial, revealing the lingering tensions and transformations within Maycomb. As Halloween approaches, the characters face new challenges that test their beliefs and resilience. This lesson will explore Aunt Alexandra’s concerns over Bob Ewell’s threats, Atticus’s perspective on danger, and the community’s journey towards healing. Through critical analysis and reflective discussion, students will examine how individual actions and societal changes contribute to the complex process of a community “becoming itself again” after a divisive event.

Learning Goals

  • I will be able to analyze Aunt Alexandra’s concerns about Bob Ewell’s threats and Atticus’s response to these threats.
  • I will be able to discuss Atticus’s outlook on the world as shown through his reactions to the possible threat posed by Bob Ewell.
  • I will be able to compare and contrast Maycomb before and after the Tom Robinson trial.

Materials

Process

  1. Read To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 27
  2. Split the class into small groups. Ask each group to find instances in Chapter 27 that indicate Aunt Alexandra’s worries about Bob Ewell, Atticus’s explanations, and any signs of foreshadowing. When groups are finished, have students write an answer to: Do you think Atticus is being cautious enough regarding Bob Ewell’s behavior? Why or why not? Use specific examples from the text to support your opinion.
  3. In pairs, students will analyze Atticus’s beliefs about the threat Bob Ewell poses and discuss what these beliefs reveal about his outlook on the world. Pairs will then share their analysis with the class, sparking a discussion on how Atticus’s principles influence his actions and perceptions.
  4. Lastly, have students create a Venn diagram comparing Maycomb before and after the Tom Robinson trial.

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